This is a reprint of the official German service manual for the Fw 190 A 1-8 range of aircraft. It covers all basic aspects of the aircraft including the fighter bomber versions. This is one of a series of German aircraft manuals being reprinted by MLRS thanks to cooperation with aircraft manual collectors in New Zealand and elsewhere. Further manuals on the Fw 190 and other German aircraft will be published. [Text in German]

This is the first history of German air defence published in English, and was written by Major-General Grabmann, who was in the Luftwaffe throughout the period. It details the creation of the Luftwaffe, and the various branches of the German air defence system, including Flak, night fighters, and the air raid protection service. This story will be continued in later publications.

This is the complete story of air lift operations carried out by the Luftwaffe during the Second World War. It includes the organisation, tasks, personnel and aircraft of the Luftwaffe transport arm, and a listing of the types of operation they were called upon to complete, in all the theatres of war in which German air and land forces were engaged. Paratroop operations are included in a complete description of an essential air service in war. Coverage of operations in the east is particularly detailed including Stalingrad, the Kuban bridgehead, Demyansk and Kholm, and theCherkassy-Korsun and Crimea operations. In the west and the Mediterranean the detail is equally valuable. Although a mundane sounding subject, this volume in the Air War series is actually full of valuable extra detail not present in other publications, and is well worth the price.

This fascinating monograph covers German Air Force support operations for the German Army from the formative period before the war (and the lessons of World War I) through to a detailed account of the forms such support took - reconnaissance, air combat and battlefield interdiction.
This is a textbook on the subject which lends itself readily to present day operations where ground support for land operations is fundamental to success in areas such as Afghanistan and Iraq.

This is the story of the Luftwaffe in the campaign in Belgium and France 1940, and the first confrontation with the French and British Air Forces. A detailed description of German air operations asgainst air and ground targets with much detail of air support for army operations. A valuable extra to clarify the campaign in the west even further.

This is the German story of the invasion of Crete in 1941, with details of the air drops carried out as well as air interdiction sorties and all other air operations during this remarkable feat of arms. Not to be missed and well worth combining with our publication on the land battle from Cabinet Papers (see Crete 1940-1941 in Research Papers) and Operation Mercury (also in Research Papers)

This is a history of aircraft maintenance, an essential service of the RAF throughout the war. Aircraft were often damaged by action other than enemy, they needed to be moved, serviced and maintained at all times, and even assembled from kits rather like aircraft models today. It may seem obvious, but the creation and use of a servicing branch was absolutely vital to the well-being of the RAF and the safety of aircrew, and this is the sometimes prosaic, sometimes exciting story of the ones who stayed on the ground.

The strategic importance of Malta to the United Kingdom in World War two cannot be overemphasised. Naval forces based there protected seaborne traffic in the Mediterranean, and the air units protected the island. There was also an offensive capability which helped disrupt supplies to North Africa and to the Italian and German forces there. The fortitude of the Maltese during the innumerable air raids was rewarded with a George Cross at the end of the war. This is the complete history of the island and the battles that went on over and around it.

Providing the personnel to perform military tasks is often problematic even in wartime - each of the services needs men (and women) and skills have to be assessed to try to put the right people in the right place - with varying degrees of success. This  RAF narrative shows how it went about its manning and how it solved the many problems that arose. It includes details of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force and the Reserve.

The Bf/Me 109 was the fighter that took on the RAF in the early part of the war, and this is the manual for a very early version - the Bf/Me 109B - one of the first production models. Every detail of the aircraft is covered, and even with no German much is understandable. Fully illustrated with many drawings of all internal fittings, plus many performance charts and other fascinating data. Originals of this pamphlet are extremely rare.

The war in North Africa saw the development of tactical air support by the RAF as well as standard interdiction and bombing operations. This is the first os a series of volumes covering RAF operations in the area, and looks at operations in Libya and the western desert from September 1939 tp June 1940. The rest of this series will follow. The Italians were the first enemy and their dispositions and operations are described, as well as the British conquest of Cyrenaica, the retreat from Agheila to the Egyptian frontier, the encirclement of Torbruk and Operation Battleaxe. This was 'pure' warfare in the sense that few civilians were involved, and bombing was tactical, and this account is a first class work on the period and the theatre.  

The war in the air was fought as a 24/7 battle and this is the story of the defence against German night air attacks in the first crucial first phase. During the day the air war was marked by growing German reluctance to send bombers over England during the day after September 1940 but at night the bombers came. The defences had to be assembled and nourished while the Luftwaffe made nightly raids particularly on London and the main ports. This is the story of that battle from the height of the daytime Battle of Britain through to the dreary nights of December 1941. An exceptional piece of historical writing, with all appendices included.

This is the first in a series of volumes covering the Invasion of France in 1944 from the air point of view. This first volume covers the period from the reorganisation of the RAF for cross-channel operations through to D-Day. It gives detailed information on organisation, deception, the Overlord plans, the employment of airborne forces, the air plan for D-Day, and the strategic and tactical plans to delay enemy reinforcements. Of real significance to all students of D-Day because of the depth of its insight into the planning stages.

There is a military adage which (edited) says "Poor planning produces poor performance" and this was never more true than in the preparation of the Overlord plan. That so much went either as it should, or nearly so, is a tribute to the administrative planning which went on before 6 June 1944. This narrative gives a great deal of information on the subject of the administrative preparations, but it is not a mere catalogue but a lively account of what to many people (service and civilian alike) is a totally non-subject: but it had to be done. The book looks at the reasons for the detailed administration plans, the evolution of strategy and the plans, the agencies involved, the Bolero plan, grand strategy for Overlord, COSSAC, USAAF, and the important "Mulberry" and "Gooseberry" inventions, supply by air and casevac and where the RAF fitted into the overall plan. Readers will be well rewarded for an exacting read of what is a fundamental document.

The continuing narrative of air elements in D-Day and its aftermath. This volume concentrates on D-Day itself and is complete with all detail and maps. The volume looks at purely air matters - bombing and enemy air force suppression, and at air-land operations - ground support, airborne landings, and all other matters involving air power. It is a ‘must-have’ for any study of D-Day in that it expands and clarifies much of the land warfare picture (already published by MLRS relating to the landings by ground forces [and see I Corps and XXX Corps narratives, and the US Beaches narrative already published]). Importantly it includes operations by the USAAF.

Operations in the Dodecanese were a side show to the main Allied effort but this paper is reprinted to help complete the story of operations in the Middle East. The narrative includes the invasions of the islands of Cos and Leros. Complete with 6 coloured maps.

This is a complete accout of the training methods used by the Germans for Aircrew from the end of the First World War to 1945. It starts with a brief resum? of the conditions imposed on German air forces by the Versailles Treaty and the attempts to circumvent the restrictions. It then turns to the evolution of the Luftwaffe and how training developed and covers the whole period through to the end of the Second World War. It is a simply fascinating account for anyone interested in the Luftwaffe and how it put such an effective air force into battle.

The training manual issued to all new C-47 (Dakota) pilots, the book covers everything needed to be known about this famous aircraft and its role as the basic transport for men and material throughout the second half of the Second World War. C-47s were everywhere, and still fly today, and their part in winning the war for the Allies cannot be underestimated. This book is important for all students of air transport, airborne operations and just famous aircraft.

The short campaign waged by the RAF in Iraq in 1941 had far less impact than recent events in that country. This is the narrative of operations in 1941 and covers the siege of Habbaniya, the relief and the advance on Baghdad. Interesting to compare the low key of these operations with the later US led operations in the last decade and more.

The RAF Pocket Book issued in 1937, and amended to 1939, is in many ways the RAF equivalent of Staff Duties in the Field, issued to ground forces. It covers administration, discipline and signals. Of particular importance to airmen it also deals with air navigation, meteorology, airmanship and many other important topics, including liaison with the Navy and the Army. It also covers explosives and weapons in 17 chapters which give a very detailed picture of how the RAF thought and worked in the years leading up to the Second World War. A rare find, this book is recommended to everyone.