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These reports were of fundamental importance in the war against the U-boats and give a complete picture of antisubmarine operations, planning and the ongoing situation as far as the Royal Navy was concerned during the war. Each report was published for the attention of all ships and was essential to all as a guide to events, and to counter-measures and tactics. Each report gives details of what the U-boats were doing throughout the month and the losses caused to merchant shipping as well as warships. The report then details the countermeasures taken against the U-boats by surface ships and aircraft. The U-boats ranged from their French bases over the North Atlantic and also passed into the Mediterranean and the Pacific and Indian oceans. The main battle however was fought on the convoy routes between Britain and the United States. The convoys themselves are covered in some detail and it is not difficult to find out the composition of virtually all convoys that sailed in the war, together with attacks and losses. The reports also contain narratives which cover specific incidents relating to U-boats, the surface ships fighting them and the aircraft operating against them. These are often first-person accounts, or taken from signals sent to the Admiralty by the participant ships or aircraft. Luckily for the modern naval historian the reports also include significant information on equipment and tactics. Innovations brought in by both sides are described as are other very interesting aspects of this decisive battle. There can be no doubt that the Battle of the Atlantic was one of the most important conflicts to be fought. Had the German U-boats been able to close the convoy routes between the United States and Great Britain, Britain would have starved and the invasion of France in 1944 might never have taken place. In all these are some of the most exciting and significant reports that MLRS has ever reprinted. This is not to belittle other very detailed reports and analyses which MLRS reprints; however, the crucial nature of the war at sea in the Atlantic against the U-boats has to be recognised as a victory that was hard-won but absolutely essential to the defeat of Germany.   Volume I covers the period from September 1939 to June 1940. 

These reports were of fundamental importance in the war against the U-boats and give a complete picture of antisubmarine operations, planning and the ongoing situation as far as the Royal Navy was concerned during the war. Each report was published for the attention of all ships and was essential to all as a guide to events, and to counter-measures and tactics. Each report gives details of what the U-boats were doing throughout the month and the losses caused to merchant shipping as well as warships. The report then details the countermeasures taken against the U-boats by surface ships and aircraft. The U-boats ranged from their French bases over the North Atlantic and also passed into the Mediterranean and the Pacific and Indian oceans. The main battle however was fought on the convoy routes between Britain and the United States. The convoys themselves are covered in some detail and it is not difficult to find out the composition of virtually all convoys that sailed in the war, together with attacks and losses. The reports also contain narratives which cover specific incidents relating to U-boats, the surface ships fighting them and the aircraft operating against them. These are often first-person accounts, or taken from signals sent to the Admiralty by the participant ships or aircraft. Luckily for the modern naval historian the reports also include significant information on equipment and tactics. Innovations brought in by both sides are described as are other very interesting aspects of this decisive battle. There can be no doubt that the Battle of the Atlantic was one of the most important conflicts to be fought. Had the German U-boats been able to close the convoy routes between the United States and Great Britain, Britain would have starved and the invasion of France in 1944 might never have taken place. In all these are some of the most exciting and significant reports that MLRS has ever reprinted. This is not to belittle other very detailed reports and analyses which MLRS reprints; however, the crucial nature of the war at sea in the Atlantic against the U-boats has to be recognised as a victory that was hard-won but absolutely essential to the defeat of Germany.  Volume II covers the period June - December 1940 

These reports were of fundamental importance in the war against the U-boats and give a complete picture of antisubmarine operations, planning and the ongoing situation as far as the Royal Navy was concerned during the war. Each report was published for the attention of all ships and was essential to all as a guide to events, and to counter-measures and tactics. Each report gives details of what the U-boats were doing throughout the month and the losses caused to merchant shipping as well as warships. The report then details the countermeasures taken against the U-boats by surface ships and aircraft. The U-boats ranged from their French bases over the North Atlantic and also passed into the Mediterranean and the Pacific and Indian oceans. The main battle however was fought on the convoy routes between Britain and the United States. The convoys themselves are covered in some detail and it is not difficult to find out the composition of virtually all convoys that sailed in the war, together with attacks and losses. The reports also contain narratives which cover specific incidents relating to U-boats, the surface ships fighting them and the aircraft operating against them. These are often first-person accounts, or taken from signals sent to the Admiralty by the participant ships or aircraft. Luckily for the modern naval historian the reports also include significant information on equipment and tactics. Innovations brought in by both sides are described as are other very interesting aspects of this decisive battle. There can be no doubt that the Battle of the Atlantic was one of the most important conflicts to be fought. Had the German U-boats been able to close the convoy routes between the United States and Great Britain, Britain would have starved and the invasion of France in 1944 might never have taken place. In all these are some of the most exciting and significant reports that MLRS has ever reprinted. This is not to belittle other very detailed reports and analyses which MLRS reprints; however, the crucial nature of the war at sea in the Atlantic against the U-boats has to be recognised as a victory that was hard-won but absolutely essential to the defeat of Germany.  Volume III covers the period January - June 1941. 

This publication is one a series of Battle summaries written and compiled by the Royal Navy after the Second World War. Naval operations in the Pacific Ocean were mainly the concern of the US Navy but the invasion of Okinawa was a joint operation between the US and Royal Navies. The book covers every possible detail needed to fully understand the strategic situation and the operation itself. It also includes material on air supremacy in the region, the Battle of the East China Sea, operations of American carriers, operations of the British Pacific Fleet and the Fleet Train of the British Fleet. Highly recommended as a part of the whole excellent series.

This naval account of operation Dragoon covers all aspects of the preparation and the landings in Southern France in August 1944. The landing aimed to increase pressure on the Germans by providing a second european assault to back up operations in the beachhead in Normandy, and to provide forces for the right wing of the eventual assault on Germany. Complete with all maps and appendices.

The invasion of Sicily was the first allied step back into Europe. This Royal Navy Battle Summary gives all details of the operation from the naval point of view. Both Task Forces (East and West) are covered together with analyses and appendices. All original maps are reproduced.

The landings in North Africa in November 1942 were the first step taken jointly by US and British Forces to end the war in North Africa and to pave the way for subsequent invasions on the mainland of Europe. This is the account of that operation. It includes details of the forces involved, the plan for the operation, the assault, the occupation of Algiers and the capture of Oran, as well as operations in French Morocco and the capture of Port Lyautey, Safi and Fedala. A well written and very good account of this operation.

The first of three volumes chronicling the operations and history of RN submarines. This volume covers operations in Home, Northern and Atlantic Waters and includes operations by allied submarines.

The most active theatre of operations for RN submarines in World War II was in the Mediterranean and this second volume of the Naval Staff trilogy covers this theatre. The narrative links the naval operations with events on land and is a very good account of the events throughout the war in this region.

The third volume of this Naval Staff History covers all operations by British and allied submarines in the war in the Far East. It is complete with all maps and appendices.

The first volume of Hurford's history covers the outbreak of the war, Norway, the Low Countries and withdrawal from the Continent (Operation DYNAMO), the Battle of Britain and defence against invasion, the Battle of the Atlantic and operations in Home Waters and the Outer Oceans. This history is used by the Naval Historical Branch as the basis for all British naval operations during the Second World War and the detail is astounding.

Volume 2 of Hurford's monumental work covers 1941 in the Mediterranean and East Africa, and also looks at commerce raiders, enemy air attacks, the Battle of the Atlantic, cooperation with the USA and Russia, the Far East and Japan (and the loss of capital ships to air attack), and the start of the convoys to Russia. The volume gives a detailed picture of the year from the point of view of the Royal Navy.

This third volume starts with the fall of Singapore in early 1942 and goes on to describe operations by the Royal Navy throughout 1942. It includes details of the Russian convoys, the escape of the German capital ships from Brest, the Bruneval and St Nazaire raids, the U-boat campaign and its extension into the western Atlantic, operations in the Mediterranean, the Malta convoys, support of the Army in Libya, operations off Ceylon, the capture of Diego Suarez, the beginning of Pacific operations, the Atlantic raiders, the air assault on Malta, the Indian Ocean, the advance from El Alamein and the anti-U-Boat campaign.

This fourth Hurford volume covers 1943 and relates operations in the Mediterranean (and the Casablanca Conference), Home Waters and the Arctic, blockade runners, coastal operations, the U-boat campaign and the turn of the tide in the War in the Atlantic, the clearance of North  Africa and the reopening of the Mediterranean, the conquest of Sicily, enemy use of glider bombs, the midget submarine attack on the Tirpitz, operations in the Indian Ocean, the stopping and restarting of Russian convoys and the Azores.

The number of naval operations carried out in 1944 was so high and the account of them so lengthy that this volume has been divided into two parts for ease of handling. The volume looks at Mediterranean operations, the work of coastal forces and raids in the Adriatic and the Aegean Seas, Home Command and Northern Waters and the Russian convoys, coastal forces, the U-boat campaign in the outer oceans, Japanese atrocities, the Eastern Fleet and progress in the Pacific, Mediterranean operations and the relief of Anzio, minelaying in the Danube, the naval air attack on the Tirpitz, German flying bomb attacks, the Invasion of Normandy, the liberation of France, the assault on Walcheren and the opening of Antwerp. In all this was a momentous year and this history does it full justice.

This final volume of Hurford recounts the last months of the war and starts with the crossing of the Rhine, and continues with Mediterranean operations, the U-boat campaign, the Indian Ocean and the Pacific, the end of the war with Germany, and the final days of the war with Japan.