In 1919 the German Army was restricted to 100,000 men by the Treaty of Versailes. In 1940 it overran Norway, Holland, Belgium and France, having defeated Poland in a lightning campaign in 1939. This paper looks at how the German Army was firstly preserved and then developed in the interim years between 1919 and 1935. There was in this period a reorganisation based on a systematic study of the tactical and operational lessons of the First World War.The author of much of the change was General Hans von Seeckt, who was the author of "Führung und Gefecht" (published 1924 and reptinted in the original German by MLRS). On the basis of the changes and the training regimes laid down in the inter-war years the German Army became the most effective army in Europe by 1939. This is an excellent paper and worthy of study. 

The research question of this thesis was to explore exactly how the Reichsheer leaders transformed their warfighting doctrine. This thesis also looks closely at the underlying organizational philosophy, and how the philosophy guided the Reichsheer leadership cadre in affecting change within the organization. Reichsheer doctrinal manuals, directives and contemporary journal articles, supplemented with American observer reports, served as primary source material for the thesis. The thesis will clearly link the importance of a leader creating and articulating an envisioned end state in successfully effecting change within a military organization. 

Another of the famous “Red Books,” this deals with the often vexing problem of moving men, stores and supplies to and in the battle area. It covers all the British campaigns in the Second World War including Iraq, Persia, North Africa, North West Europe, India, Ceylon, Burma and the Far East. Reading the book shows that what could be boring is in fact fascinating, and the book is highly recommended.